Her name was Lola l-o-l-a Lola

by davebarclay1954

Yes, it’s tough at the moment still so I’ve decided to try for 3 blogs a week until my time becomes my own again. That means that any blogs I’ve missed will be coming along later at the rate of 3 a week less what has already been completed. If I could be so bold as to leave here for a brief moment (you will be getting photos of the Newcastle/Gateshead bridges as promised). If you can find a copy of The Nice album Five Bridges I can highly recommend it as I dug out my copy and ripped it to iTunes then put it on my iPhone and have been listening to it constantly ever since. It was recorded in the late 60’s in Newcastle and the cover is of the 5 bridges spanning the Tyne at that time. There are more now including the Gateshead Millenium Bridge (or the Eye as us locals know it). Ok without further ado here they are:

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This is the Eye, so called because it moves to allow ships underneath and looks like an eye winking, especially at night.

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This is the swing bridge which has been flooded due to the rainfall in 2012. (I’m not sure if the Bridge was flooded or just the access roads on either bank).

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In the background you can see the Tyne Bridge which is still the busiest crossing between Newcastle and Gateshead.

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This is the Newburn Bridge which links Blaydon and Ryton areas of Gateshead with Newburn, Throckley, Lemington and Ponteland villages. It is a single carriageway controlled by Traffic Lights at either end.

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This is Lemington Bridge which isn’t a Tyne Bridge in the strictest sense as it goes over the Lemington Gut which used to be part of the Tyne until 1880 when the river course was changed to make the river shorter and deeper.

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One of the more recent bridges across the Tyne this takes the A1 across the Tyne between Newcastle and the Metro Centre/Team Valley shopping areas of Gateshead.

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This is the Scotswood Bridge which was opened in 1967 and replaced the old Chain Bridge which had been built towards the end of the 19th century and was no longer wide enough to cope with the demands placed upon it after WWII.

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This is the Redheugh Bridge carrying 4 lanes of traffic, unfortunately as there is no structure above the bridge itself it often has to be closed to high vehicles during heavy winds, and sometimes is closed to all traffic if the wind is particularly bad.

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This is the King Edward Bridge, it was built as a railway bridge to stop the dangerous procedure of reversing trains out of Newcastle Central Station to continue travelling North, which used to happen when they used the High Level Bridge.

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This is the High Level Bridge which opened in 1849 to cover the need for a bridge linking the South with Newcastle and Edinburgh for trains and underneath the trains the carriageway carried carts and pedestrians. The carriageway has been narrowed to a single lane and is only used by buses and taxis going South from Newcastle to Gateshead. Pedestrians can still cross in either direction.

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This is the Metro Bridge carrying the Tyne and Wear Metro across the Tyne in both directions. It was opened on 6 November 1981 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

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